huion inspiroy h1060p review

Huion Inspiroy H1060P review

Huion Inspiroy H1060P review: Generous workspace, generous amount of express keys

Huion has been making pen tablets since 2011, and they’ve been a productive company. The company showcased its new Inspiroy 2 at CES 2023. I took the Huion Inspiroy 1060P, provided to me by Huion for testing, for a spin.

huion inspiroy box

Nice box.

Type of tablet:

Graphics, non-screen
EMR digitizer
Needs to connect to computer (laptop/desktop) or Android device
Works with: Windows, Mac, Android, Linux

Other features:

Size: 14 x 9 x 0.31
Active area: 10x 6.25″
Weight: 27 oz (770g)
Made of: plastic exterior
8192 pressure levels
Battery-free PW100 pen
+/- 60 degrees of tilt
28 programmable keys (12 press keys and 16 softkeys)

PW100 pen weight: 11g (about .4 oz)

When used with Android phone:
Phone working area: (Phone Mode)
3.9 inches x 6.25 in. (99.3 x 158.8mm )

What’s in the Box?

huion inspiroy h1060 p review

The Inspiroy comes with all this.

Tablet
USB-C to USB connector
USB-to USB-C adapter for Mac
Quickstart guide

Nib holder with 10 extra nibs (total 11 nibs including the one that comes in the pen)

The tablet came in a nicely designed, hard box with a colorful graphic. The box makes it suitable as a gift. Inside is everything you need to use it, including adapters.

The H1060P’s generous size makes it ideal for drawing. It also is fairly lightweight, making it suitable for travel.

Build quality

It’s well built but as it’s lightweight and slim, I wouldn’t want to bang it around. The keys click crisply when pressed. The USB-port is snug, no looseness or issues.

Unlike many graphics tablets that have a beaded or rubbery texture on the drawing area, this one is smooth. It’s not slippery, but it doesn’t have that tooth that some prefer. But, it’s quieter, and pen nibs ought to last longer on it. It doesn’t attract oil and dust as much as the rubbery surface would.

The Huion Inspiroy has a whopping 28 programmable keys, 12 that are buttons with 12 more that you program in, so you can really speed up your workflow. You can open programs, zoom and pan, and make any keystroke you want and do it per app. Some keystrokes vary from app to app. Also, you need to know the keystrokes that the app uses.

Installing the driver

The correct driver on the Huion site is the latest Inspiroy Pro 8192, though the box doesn’t say the 8192. The driver for Windows installed easily as did the one for Mac. I did have to unplug then plug in the tablet for Mac (Ventura.)

The programming process is more complicated than those of many similar tablets. I somewhat prefer the kind that has a menu, but with this many keys, that would get overwhelming.

The pen has programmable buttons that do pretty basic functions, with multimedia being one that’s not that common.

The phone mode on the tablet is just a small active area. I don’t use Phone Mode, but I’m glad it’s there, just in case.

The tablet is fine for left- and right-handed people, and lets you map the active area.

Drawing on the Huion

The PW100 pen is lightweight, so doesn’t have a lot of balance on your hand. But the lightweight pen also causes very little strain. The pen is a comfortable width to hold.

The size is great and certainly ideal for a drawing tablet–it’s “just right.”

I do miss having a texture on the surface as it feels a bit slippery, but I like that it’s quieter.

The pen loop on the right holds the pen well.

Art program testing

The Inspiroy driver worked well in Windows on almost everything I tried–Photoshop, Inkscape, Krita, and Clip Studio Paint, though not well with Gimp.

On Mac, it worked great in Gimp, including with pressure. It also worked great in everything else I tested: Photoshop, Krita, ClipStudio Paint, Inkscape, and as a general mouse.

(Inkscape seems to work fine with Mac Ventura, though the site says they’re still working on it).

I didn’t experience lag or other issues.

The biggest and happiest surprise was that I was able to get pressure in Inkscape, a free vector art program similar to Adobe Illustrator, with the calligraphy pen both on Windows and Mac. I’m uncertain as to whether it has more to do with the driver or with an update to Inkscape.

Pros

Size
Affordability
Portability
Gets pressure in Inkscape
Many Express Keys
Ability to use on Mac, Windows, Linux, and Android
Nice printed box

Cons

Surface may be too smooth for some artists
Driver isn’t that easy to program

Inspiroy H1060P vs. Wacom Intuos Medium

For the price, this tablet really offers almost everything the Wacom Intuos Medium does, including levels of pressure, tilt, and programming of the keys. The pen isn’t as luxurious nor as programmable, but the Huion is way more affordable. It does what it promises to do. I haven’t done longterm testing, but so far it’s fine.

┬áIt comes with the adapters you need and a good amount of extra nibs. It doesn’t have the extras of the Intuos, such as bundled art software (some of which is a trial), a wireless option, or that nice tacky (in a good way) texture.

It has fewer programming options for the pen (which is also lighter), a smoother surface, it’s more lightweight, and there’s no wireless option, and no bundled software.

The Verdict

If you don’t need so many express keys, you don’t have to use them, or any, but they’re there if you want.

This would be a nice addition to any artist’s toolbox and the decorative box makes it an appropriate gift for anyone who does digital art, graphic or other design, photo editing, OSU, or replacing a mouse.

See it on Amazon

 

end of Huion Inspiroy H1060P review

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